The Grandmaster

As soon as I got to my hotel, I launched myself out onto the streets. My brother always told me, “The best way to get to know a new city is by walking around and getting lost.” I didn’t even take the time to Google ‘Belize City’; if I had, I would have learned that Belize used to be a colony of Britain and was called British Honduras – or I would have seen the endless warnings to get the hell out of there. An economic downturn coupled with President Trump’s decision to deport illegal immigrants with criminal records had resulted in a lot of people returning to Belize City with no job, no prospects and desperation rising.

I wandered down dark streets, expecting the buildings to rise and to get that familiar imposing city feeling, but the run down housing continued on and on. Belize has the lowest population density in Central America and that is clear from the size of their capital. I eventually found the city center, a large crowd was gathered at an open air concert. As I arrived the last chords rang out and the crowd dispersed within minutes, scattering into dark alleyways. That is the sort of timing you can expecting with long term travel.

I gave up on my wandering tour and decided to head back to my hotel. An old black man with a silver beard glinting in the darkness stepped in front of me.

“I am Leroy. Where you from?”

“Ireland.”

I was used to answering Irelanda from my stay in Mexico, just saying Ireland is too much of a leap for Mexico, they stare at you confused and when you follow up with ‘Irelanda’ their eyes light up and they shout ‘Ahh’ every single time. Belize is English speaking, but with a Caribbean twist that makes it almost unintelligible when they are speaking to each other, and really cool when they are speaking to foreigners.

‘Ahh. Come in and have a drink in my bar.’ He pointed at the Chinese restaurant across the road. The first room contained an imposing five foot tall solid wood bar on the right hand side. A handful of Belizeans crowded around the bar on cheap metal bar stools. We passed through the next door to the Chinese restaurant. Wooden chairs surrounded white folding plastic tables. Belize being a heavily Catholic country, a Madonna figurine looked down protectively over the bar. We sat and watched some random Basketball game on the small old CRT TV. Leroy headed behind the bar and came back with two rum and cokes.

“Let me introduce you to the owner, Liu this guy is from Ireland.” The owner of the bar looked across disinterestedly, ‘Hey.’ The staff had a familiar dynamic with Leroy – I had seen in many times in bars across the world, an acceptance that the local barfly is going to be there anyway so you might as well put him to work. It was an air of tolerance rather than acceptance.

“What are the police like in Belize?” Getting robbed twice by the police in Mexico had made me weary. “Oh the Police?” His head dropped into his hands dramatically. “You understand?” I understood.

Leroy leaned over to me. “I’m famous you know. They call me the Grandmaster. Look it up.” I Googled ‘The Grandmaster Belize’ In the photos a young man shone up at me, a look of hope in his eyes. I looked up at Leroy, the years had taken their toll, a hard life had beaten the light out of his eyes. He was a dub poet who had found success writing poems about life growing up in Belize’s dreaded Majestic Alley. “You see that concert in town tonight?” I nodded. “I was the warm up act.”

“This is a tough place. You see the people behind the bar? All men, you know why?” I shook my head. “When this place goes off, it really goes off.” His voice lowered. “You see those holes in the ceiling? They’re bullet holes. You should not walk back to your hotel from here, you should get a taxi.”

I wondered aloud “If things are so bad, why do you stay here?”

“I am Belize.”

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