Peril in Peru

I had been riding the PanAmerican Highway down the length of Peru. Endless desert asphalt where the wind winds up across the entire ocean to punch you right in the side of the head. An unseen force trying to tear your helmet off for hours at a time. After a grueling week it was finally time to turn inland and up the mountains to the magical Macchu Picchu.

33 degrees. As I rose from the desert floor the temperature steadily dropped. 23 degrees. I stopped to add a layer of UnderArmour. 14 degrees. I changed to winter gloves. 10 degrees. A storm cloud rolled in and the temperature plummeted just as I came to the crest of a hill. 4 degrees. Huge hailstones pelted the bike, a layer of ice coating the road. I slowed to a crawl, my boots sliding along the ground on either side of the bike. In Alaska a grizzled motorcycle rider who had just finished his world tour had given me some advice, “When the going gets rough, don’t try to be a hero and stay up – walk your bike through. It’ll be slow but not as slow as finding a mechanic or a hospital.” A horn blared, the only other car on the lonely mountain road rolled past. When you manage to get a horn from the unflappable Peruvian drivers you know things have gone horribly wrong.

I followed two black tyre tracks through the pristine white landscape. They suddenly veered off the road. A tourist jeep sat perched on the rocks as if placed there by some long forgotten mountain giant. Thunder cracked in the distance to round out the terrifying scene in front of me. The driver climbed up to me and spoke in Spanish. I asked “Are you ok? Any injuries?” He gave me a thumbs up. Not being able to speak any Spanish, he lost interest in me so I continued my downhill slide. If the storm had closed in on the way up the hill there was no way I could have kept going. Just past the crashed jeep, the ice started to part and then disappeared. I pulled in at the next toll booth and gesticulated wildly to mime that a car had crashed back up the road. The disinterested man in the toll booth mimed a phone up to his ear, a symbol that he had already called it in.

The temperature lingered at 4 degrees. Just as I was congratulating myself on surviving the icecapades, a police siren wailed behind me. I pulled in and through some broken English, broken Spanish and the international language of mime, the message was conveyed. “Stop at the next town, it is snowing ahead.” In response I mimed a tent. He shook his head, “Stop at the next town.”

I made it to the town of Negro Maya. It was really just a small cluster of stone cottages that looked like they were straight out of 1850s Ireland. The first house I approached had a young woman in full traditional Peruvian dress in the doorway. I asked in my best Spanish if there was a place I could stay. She did not answer. I repeated ‘Hoteles?’ several times with more and more ambitious pronunciation. She looked at me, confused, in deafening silence. She raised her hand and flicked her wrist to shoo me away. It occurred to me much later that she didn’t speak Spanish, only Quechua – the native Peruvian language in the Andes.

The next house had two unquestionably native Peruvians sitting at a bench outside. They looked like they could have been sitting there discussing the events of the day since the fall of the Incan Empire. Thankfully one of them spoke Spanish. I asked again if I could stay. He shook his head and pointed to the road, “30 kilometers.” I told him that the police had told me to stay in this town because it was snowing ahead. He looked up at me starting to lose his patience, “Then drive CAREFULLY.”

I slowly rode towards the next town. Thoughts of how I could have flown to Cusco, or skipped it completely ran through my mind as the setting sun lit up the sky in a dazzling shade of orange. I arrived in the dark, the snow covered mountain peak to the left of the road glinting in the moonlight. This town was a slightly larger version of the previous one. To the right was a barn like structure, in decades old faint writing I could just make out the word ‘Hosteria’. I pulled in.

Inside there was a single large room; on the left side there were shelves that had biscuits and bottle of Coca-Cola (the one universal constant). On the right side there was a table and chairs and a big old television showing soccer: the national obsession. Watching the match was the owner, one glance told me everything I needed to know about him. He was an old bachelor farmer, a wild breed – the same the world over. I asked him if I could stay. He smiled, “10 Soles” (about $3.10) “Come.” He led me out the back door. Chickens ran between my legs and around the back yard. A rickety staircase led up to a three room extension that he had clearly, proudly built himself. Large unfinished wooden beams supported a corrugated steel roof. At the points where the beams intersected with the walls, cracks ran out in every direction. The far side of the yard had a small building with BANOS sprawled in white paint. An outhouse that had three small rooms with a hole in the ground, and each one in a more horrifying state than the last. He cooked up a dinner of fish that he had caught in the river and potatoes that he had grown himself.

The next morning I packed my bags, opened the large metal gate and pulled out onto the highway. As the road rose out of town I heard a deep agricultural ancestral voice in my head, “The chickens will get out…” I turned around, pulled the heavy gates shut as best I could from the outside and headed back into the mountains.

The rest of the road to Cusco was a beautiful twisty winding road with temperatures in the 20s. I checked into my hotel and headed straight out to get tickets to Macchu Picchu to keep my trip on track. I paid $300 and they gave me tickets; I pointed out that my passport number was wrong and they replied with the one line that sums up South America perfectly – “If at least 50% is correct, everything will be fine.”

I waited outside my hotel at 3AM for my tour bus. And waited. At 4AM a woman walked out of the darkness shouting my name. I followed her to a small white car which drove me to the tour bus. The bus was running late and to make up time the driver sped through town and careened around hairpin bends. The only movement he made that was not driving related was to learn over and turn up the radio when Spandau Ballet’s True came on. He overtook two cars on a blind corner. ‘…Always in time, but never in line for dreams…’

He made it to the train station just in time. The platform was swarming with people boarding the train, all of them kitted out in designer gym gear. North Face jackets as far as the eye could see. Except for one hero. A Japanese man with a top knot was dressed in full ceremonial Japanese clothing.

A short train journey later our tour guide was explaining how Hiram Bingham, the explorer, discovered Macchu Picchu – The natives pointed to the top of the mountain and said, “There are ruins up there.” He asked for a guide and they sent a small child to show him around. That was some good exploring. When you enter Macchu Picchu the mountain and ruins are laid out in a magnificent vista. Every picture you’ve ever seen of Macchu Picchu comes to life right in front of you. It is the one tourist attraction that truly does not disappoint.

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